Author Topic: Tumeric  (Read 65 times)

Mugwump

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Tumeric
« on: June 12, 2019, 03:04:39 PM »
Pain reliever

Turmeric can also act as a chronic pain reliever because of its fantastic anti-inflammatory properties.

There is even a study that says the powder may be as effective as ibuprofen when it comes to relieving pain and with fewer side effects.

for dogs also....

https://relieved.co/turmeric-for-older-dogs-health/?fbclid=IwAR0Vmj76KibBq6dAXw5Q7d3f3lqC7jsNQhbHhyUHwcQHvQTnMuGzOPsDu1Q
Jon

?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ?Wow! What a Ride!? ~ Hunter S. Thompson

Rjb3

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2019, 04:13:08 PM »
I put it in all my fish food.

LizStreithorst

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2019, 04:32:43 PM »
Cool captain.  I'm going to try it for my pet hen with a hurt leg.
Always move forward. Never look back.

Mugwump

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2019, 06:02:32 PM »
Jon

?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ?Wow! What a Ride!? ~ Hunter S. Thompson

LizStreithorst

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2019, 07:36:19 PM »
How dare you make fun of me because I have a pet chicken.  I rescued her.  She's special to me. 

I did a bit or researhc and found out that banamine works well in chickens given either IV or by mouth.  I don't want to consider giving an IV injection to a chicken.  I've never tried to dose a chicken in the mouth.  I'll have to see how bad it tastes.  If it's not terrible I'll mix it an a scrambled egg to feed her.
Always move forward. Never look back.

BillT

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2019, 10:53:04 PM »
You might want to try injecting some into a cricket.

Mugwump

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2019, 04:23:05 AM »

....."How dare you make fun of me because I have a pet chicken.  I rescued her.  She's special to me."

......not my intent.....  but like Bill said... :)
Jon

?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ?Wow! What a Ride!? ~ Hunter S. Thompson

LizStreithorst

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2019, 08:15:10 AM »
Fine.  Just don't expect any sympathy when one of y'all has a sick pet.
Always move forward. Never look back.

Mugwump

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2019, 08:37:42 AM »
Fine.  Just don't expect any sympathy when one of y'all has a sick pet.

..oh good grief..... wfwf
Jon

?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ?Wow! What a Ride!? ~ Hunter S. Thompson

Ron Sower

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2019, 11:58:25 AM »
...Da-yam...! Some serious drama going on here!!!... ;D
Even duct tape can't fix stupid ... but it can muffle the sound...and zip ties, properly applied, can reduce the movement!

Mugwump

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2019, 12:51:06 PM »
...Da-yam...! Some serious drama going on here!!!... ;D

...huh?..... huh
Jon

?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ?Wow! What a Ride!? ~ Hunter S. Thompson

LizStreithorst

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2019, 02:06:00 PM »
I will tell you the story about this chicken and perhaps you'll understand why I was offended.

I rescued after she had escaped from the truck load with chickens packed into cages on their way to the processing plant.  She had a hurt leg so I thought I would have to kill her but when I noticed her improving I gave her time and it healed.  She was infested with mites and had worms to I treated her.  She was a scrawny little thing but after I got rid of the parasites she started gaining weight.

At first she stayed in one place like she was forced to do in the chicken house.  Little by little she started to explore the fish room where she lived.  I started taking her outside and she discovered grass and the joy in pecking and scratching around looking for grubs and worms to eat.  I've never seen such a happy chicken as she was when she discovered dusting in loose dry dirt.  My hens take behavior for granted, but not her because she had always lived in packed in a small cage with other chickens like her that were not treated like animals with real feelings.  It's a cruel way to raise chickens for meat, but it's the way it's done commercially.

Little by little the leg healed.  She didn't even limp.  She became fond of me but also liked going outside learning how to be a real chicken, but she always wanted to come back inside at night.  The morning of the day her leg got hurt for the second time she actually nagged me to open the door so she could go outside.  When I went to let her in that evening she couldn't walked.  She used her right leg and left wing to get around.  She was in a lot of pain.

This was a few days ago.  This morning she improved just a bit so I'm hoping not to have to euthanize her.  I'll give her time like I did the last time and hope for the best.

This breed of chicken isn't supposed to live to egg laying age even if they are not sent to slaughter.  They are bred to grow fast and gain weight fast.  They are often taken to the processing plant at 7 to 8 weeks of age.  Even if they are allowed to mature their legs are too weak to support their weight and their internal organs not large enough to support her mass.

My hen has been laying a very large beige pink egg every day for 4 days then taking a break for a day, sometimes two days.  She's been doing this for a couple of months now.  She is a remarkable chicken.

I know that it's not the regular thing for a chicken to be a pet and I honestly didn't know what I was getting myself into when I rescued her, but as I saw her improve a bit and learn how to be a chicken  captured a piece of my heart.     

Her legs were getting quite strong and she was mostly walking around rather than just sitting.  What I figured happened is that the Rooster jumped on her and did his thing.  She was already supporting a lot of weight and when the rooster got on top of her this time her leg gave out.  The reason I think she might recover is because chicken legs and feet are made mostly of connective tissue so it can heal. 

I would think that nice people would hope the best for her rather than make a joke of her. 
Always move forward. Never look back.

Mugwump

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2019, 03:02:59 PM »
I will tell you the story about this chicken and perhaps you'll understand why I was offended.

I rescued after she had escaped from the truck load with chickens packed into cages on their way to the processing plant.  She had a hurt leg so I thought I would have to kill her but when I noticed her improving I gave her time and it healed.  She was infested with mites and had worms to I treated her.  She was a scrawny little thing but after I got rid of the parasites she started gaining weight.

At first she stayed in one place like she was forced to do in the chicken house.  Little by little she started to explore the fish room where she lived.  I started taking her outside and she discovered grass and the joy in pecking and scratching around looking for grubs and worms to eat.  I've never seen such a happy chicken as she was when she discovered dusting in loose dry dirt.  My hens take behavior for granted, but not her because she had always lived in packed in a small cage with other chickens like her that were not treated like animals with real feelings.  It's a cruel way to raise chickens for meat, but it's the way it's done commercially.

Little by little the leg healed.  She didn't even limp.  She became fond of me but also liked going outside learning how to be a real chicken, but she always wanted to come back inside at night.  The morning of the day her leg got hurt for the second time she actually nagged me to open the door so she could go outside.  When I went to let her in that evening she couldn't walked.  She used her right leg and left wing to get around.  She was in a lot of pain.

This was a few days ago.  This morning she improved just a bit so I'm hoping not to have to euthanize her.  I'll give her time like I did the last time and hope for the best.

This breed of chicken isn't supposed to live to egg laying age even if they are not sent to slaughter.  They are bred to grow fast and gain weight fast.  They are often taken to the processing plant at 7 to 8 weeks of age.  Even if they are allowed to mature their legs are too weak to support their weight and their internal organs not large enough to support her mass.

My hen has been laying a very large beige pink egg every day for 4 days then taking a break for a day, sometimes two days.  She's been doing this for a couple of months now.  She is a remarkable chicken.

I know that it's not the regular thing for a chicken to be a pet and I honestly didn't know what I was getting myself into when I rescued her, but as I saw her improve a bit and learn how to be a chicken  captured a piece of my heart.     

Her legs were getting quite strong and she was mostly walking around rather than just sitting.  What I figured happened is that the Rooster jumped on her and did his thing.  She was already supporting a lot of weight and when the rooster got on top of her this time her leg gave out.  The reason I think she might recover is because chicken legs and feet are made mostly of connective tissue so it can heal. 

I would think that nice people would hope the best for her rather than make a joke of her.

Well bless her heart......
Jon

?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ?Wow! What a Ride!? ~ Hunter S. Thompson

BillT

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2019, 03:36:47 PM »
Chickens are taxonomically dinosaurs you know (birds evolved from dinosaurs).
So, she's got that going for her!

However, it sounds like her genetics are messed up:
Quote
This breed of chicken isn't supposed to live to egg laying age even if they are not sent to slaughter.  They are bred to grow fast and gain weight fast.  They are often taken to the processing plant at 7 to 8 weeks of age.  Even if they are allowed to mature their legs are too weak to support their weight and their internal organs not large enough to support her mass.

LizStreithorst

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Re: Tumeric
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2019, 03:40:54 PM »
Yes they are messed up but those are the genes needed to produce cheap meat.  Back before I was born a chicken meal was made from a layer that had passed it's egg laying age.  A chicken in every pot was a pipe dream. 
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