Author Topic: net nuetrality explained...  (Read 78 times)

Mugwump

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net nuetrality explained...
« on: January 24, 2018, 06:15:08 PM »
Jon

?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ?Wow! What a Ride!? ~ Hunter S. Thompson

BallAquatics

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Re: net nuetrality explained...
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2018, 06:34:55 PM »
Quote
Dear Mr. Ball:

Thank you for expressing your concerns regarding the implementation of net neutrality.

In December 2017, the FCC, led by Chairman Ajit Pai, voted 3-2 to repeal the net neutrality regulations put in place by the FCC in 2015. I am concerned that this decision will restrict the ability of Ohioans to access internet. Ohioans increasingly live their lives online, and some communities have only one option for their broadband service provider. As consumers, we expect that the broadband services we pay for will provide unfettered access to an open marketplace of goods, services, and ideas. The FCC’s new rule allows service providers to throttle back internet speeds and offer better connectivity to the highest bidder, restricting consumers’ choices and the ability for small businesses to compete against larger companies that can afford to pay premiums. In an industry where consumers’ choice of provider is already limited, we must take steps to ensure that our access to content is not controlled by the service providers they are forced to rely on.

The FCC’s ruling repeals the 2015 Open Internet Rule which gave the FCC authority to regulate broadband internet service as a public utility. This allowed the FCC to supervise broadband providers and take action if providers’ policies or pricing do not preserve the idea of a free and open internet. Then-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said that this proposal would keep providers from blocking content, slowing delivery of select sites, or charging content providers a premium for faster delivery than other traffic.

The December vote on Chairman Pai’s Restoring Internet Freedom rule re-classified fixed and mobile broadband internet service as an “information service,” reverting to the classification that was in place before the 2015 rule change. This re-classification eliminates the FCC’s authority to regulate certain aspects of broadband internet services, thereby eliminating many of the protections established by the 2015 Open Internet rule.

In response to the FCC’s harmful action, I have introduced a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution with over thirty of my Senate colleagues that would reverse the FCC’s December ruling. Because internet providers should not be able to slow down your internet access or charge you more based on the shows you watch, the teams you cheer for, or your political views.

I will continue to closely monitor the FCC’s actions and should legislation related to net neutrality come before the Senate, I will keep your thoughts in mind.

                                                            Sincerely,

                                                            Sherrod Brown
                                                            United States Senator

Dennis

Mugwump

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Re: net nuetrality explained...
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2018, 06:40:18 PM »
Quote
Dear Mr. Ball:

Thank you for expressing your concerns regarding the implementation of net neutrality.

In December 2017, the FCC, led by Chairman Ajit Pai, voted 3-2 to repeal the net neutrality regulations put in place by the FCC in 2015. I am concerned that this decision will restrict the ability of Ohioans to access internet. Ohioans increasingly live their lives online, and some communities have only one option for their broadband service provider. As consumers, we expect that the broadband services we pay for will provide unfettered access to an open marketplace of goods, services, and ideas. The FCC’s new rule allows service providers to throttle back internet speeds and offer better connectivity to the highest bidder, restricting consumers’ choices and the ability for small businesses to compete against larger companies that can afford to pay premiums. In an industry where consumers’ choice of provider is already limited, we must take steps to ensure that our access to content is not controlled by the service providers they are forced to rely on.

The FCC’s ruling repeals the 2015 Open Internet Rule which gave the FCC authority to regulate broadband internet service as a public utility. This allowed the FCC to supervise broadband providers and take action if providers’ policies or pricing do not preserve the idea of a free and open internet. Then-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said that this proposal would keep providers from blocking content, slowing delivery of select sites, or charging content providers a premium for faster delivery than other traffic.

The December vote on Chairman Pai’s Restoring Internet Freedom rule re-classified fixed and mobile broadband internet service as an “information service,” reverting to the classification that was in place before the 2015 rule change. This re-classification eliminates the FCC’s authority to regulate certain aspects of broadband internet services, thereby eliminating many of the protections established by the 2015 Open Internet rule.

In response to the FCC’s harmful action, I have introduced a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution with over thirty of my Senate colleagues that would reverse the FCC’s December ruling. Because internet providers should not be able to slow down your internet access or charge you more based on the shows you watch, the teams you cheer for, or your political views.

I will continue to closely monitor the FCC’s actions and should legislation related to net neutrality come before the Senate, I will keep your thoughts in mind.

                                                            Sincerely,

                                                            Sherrod Brown
                                                            United States Senator

Dennis

.... |^|....
Jon

?Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ?Wow! What a Ride!? ~ Hunter S. Thompson

Ron Sower

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Re: net nuetrality explained...
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2018, 10:24:49 AM »
Quote
Dear Mr. Ball:

Thank you for expressing your concerns regarding the implementation of net neutrality.

In December 2017, the FCC, led by Chairman Ajit Pai, voted 3-2 to repeal the net neutrality regulations put in place by the FCC in 2015. I am concerned that this decision will restrict the ability of Ohioans to access internet. Ohioans increasingly live their lives online, and some communities have only one option for their broadband service provider. As consumers, we expect that the broadband services we pay for will provide unfettered access to an open marketplace of goods, services, and ideas. The FCC’s new rule allows service providers to throttle back internet speeds and offer better connectivity to the highest bidder, restricting consumers’ choices and the ability for small businesses to compete against larger companies that can afford to pay premiums. In an industry where consumers’ choice of provider is already limited, we must take steps to ensure that our access to content is not controlled by the service providers they are forced to rely on.

The FCC’s ruling repeals the 2015 Open Internet Rule which gave the FCC authority to regulate broadband internet service as a public utility. This allowed the FCC to supervise broadband providers and take action if providers’ policies or pricing do not preserve the idea of a free and open internet. Then-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said that this proposal would keep providers from blocking content, slowing delivery of select sites, or charging content providers a premium for faster delivery than other traffic.

The December vote on Chairman Pai’s Restoring Internet Freedom rule re-classified fixed and mobile broadband internet service as an “information service,” reverting to the classification that was in place before the 2015 rule change. This re-classification eliminates the FCC’s authority to regulate certain aspects of broadband internet services, thereby eliminating many of the protections established by the 2015 Open Internet rule.

In response to the FCC’s harmful action, I have introduced a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution with over thirty of my Senate colleagues that would reverse the FCC’s December ruling. Because internet providers should not be able to slow down your internet access or charge you more based on the shows you watch, the teams you cheer for, or your political views.

I will continue to closely monitor the FCC’s actions and should legislation related to net neutrality come before the Senate, I will keep your thoughts in mind.

                                                            Sincerely,

                                                            Sherrod Brown
                                                            United States Senator

Dennis

.... |^|....
...+ |^|
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